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Department of Agricultural & Extension Education

Physical Address:
Agricultural & Extension Education Building, Room 102
1134 West 6th Street

Mailing Address:
875 Perimeter Drive MS 2040
Moscow, ID 83844-2040

Phone: 208-885-6358

Fax: 208-885-4039

Email: aee@uidaho.edu

Web: uidaho.edu/cals/aee

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The Hoot, Spring 2019

Opportunities in International Agriculture

As future leaders in the agricultural industry, undergraduates should consider learning about international agriculture. The agricultural industry spans the globe and includes international agriculture trade, agricultural development work, formal agricultural education and non-formal extension education. As students you have the opportunity to expand your horizons outside of the United States, by taking advantage of the following educational activities in the department.

Ag Ed 406 Exploring International Agriculture is a three-credit course that introduces students to agriculture in other countries, government and non-government organizations, agricultural education and extension work around the world. Students focus on a specific region and country to learn about that area’s culture, education, government and agricultural production and exports.

Ag Ed 407 Global Agricultural and Life Sciences Systems is a three-credit course that allows students to travel to other countries to experience their culture, natural resources, and agricultural industries. Bob Haggerty, Ph.D., director of CALS International Programs, leads the different sections of Ag Ed 407 each spring semester. Current sections allow students to experience agriculture in Taiwan, Mexico, Ireland and Spain. Our plans are to add a section to visit China in spring 2020.

A proposal to establish an international agriculture minor is being completed this semester. If approved students could add this minor beginning in the 2019-2020 academic year. The minor will include Ag Ed 406 and Ag Ed 407, and the new CLDR 480 Change and Power in a Global Society that will be taught by Sarah Bush, Ph.D., assistant professor of agricultural communications and leadership in AEE.

Additional elective courses in world geography; international politics; intercultural communications; and food, culture and society are also included in the proposed minor.

These courses and new minor will give CALS and AEE students the opportunities to learn about international agriculture, experience other countries and become a leader in the global agriculture industry. When opportunity knocks to experience international agriculture, will you open the door?

Go Vandals!

Jim Connors

 

Jim Connors, Department Head
Department of Agricultural and Extension Education

 


 Alumni Spotlight

Brendan MingoBrendan Mingo is a five-year alumni from the agricultural and extension education graduate program. He grew up in Rockland, Idaho, where he helped on the family wheat farm and the neighbors cattle ranch. Brendan is currently working for Bayer Crop Science as an agronomic research specialist, where he helps develop new varieties of wheat through field-testing. Brendan initially attended college to be more competitive in farming, his plans changed when he took an internship with Land O Lakes with their field research team doing answer plots.

Brendan took the opportunity to finish his college career through the extension education graduate program. He is grateful for the graduate program and encourages anyone who is in a situation to utilize the program, to do so. Brendan’s advice for current college students planning to work in agriculture is to obtain your CDL, UAS pilots license, private or commercial pesticide license and become as familiar as you can with digital AG.

When asked about his most memorable moments through his career, Brendan feels his career started in high school working for his neighbors. He holds his memories on the ranch and the farm as his fondest. However, the work he currently does means the most to him because he knows the research he does enhances farmer’s harvests. His mentors have been all of the old farmers and ranchers he worked for growing up, including his Grandpa. He now strives to be a mentor to his son.

Q: Which college class did you find most rewarding or beneficial?
A: Math, science and writing. Everything is appendages of those core classes.

Q: What is your go to interview outfit?
A: Khakis, button up shirt and tie (business casual). I try not to be overdressed or underdressed.

Written by TyAnn Tellefson

Jay SuttonJay Sutton is a five-year alumni from the University of Idaho College of Agricultural and Life Sciences. Jay grew up and currently resides in Fruitland, Idaho. Growing up, both sides of his family were involved in agriculture, farming in Parma and Vale. His time spent working on the farm in Vale, solidified his desire to be involved in agriculture. Jay currently works for Seminis Seed Company as a foundation seed research assistant, where he works with new varieties of sweet corn, onion and carrot seed.

Jay values the education he received from the University of Idaho as it prepared him for the real-world work force. He states that this education taught him to become organized and time efficient. Jay misses all of the great friendships he made while being in Moscow. He especially misses all of his professors, and more personally his advisor Jeremy Falk, Ph.D., who had a very large impact on his education. Jay advises all college students with the following, “My advice would be to find your passion and pursue it. Do something that you enjoy doing and every day will not feel like you are working. I have had the jobs where I would wake up every morning and dread going into work. You can always make a change, I think that was the biggest fear I had when I was trying to figure out my major or what kind of job I would like. Life is too dang short, find that thing that makes you happy and go for it.”

Jay finds that his parents, who have always been there for him, to be some of his greatest mentors and supporters. He mentions that his grandfather who farmed in Vale, Oregon, was one of the biggest reasons he chose to pursue agriculture. He attempts to be a mentor to any college or high school students looking into his field of work and agriculture in general.

Q: Which college class did you find most rewarding or beneficial?
A: I can't narrow it down to just one, I think just in general all of my classes had some sort of positive impact on my life and career. I did enjoy small engines and shop skills with Marvin Heimgartner and Jack McHargue.

Q: What is your go to interview outfit?
A: Depends on the job, but usually slacks, long sleeve button up, tie and a sports jacket.

Written by TyAnn Tellefson

Student Spotlight

Makenna EllinghausMakenna Ellinghaus is a junior studying agricultural education. She was raised in Snohomish, Washington, where she grew up showing horses in 4-H as well as at local and breed shows across the Pacific Northwest. Makenna’s true agricultural exposure happened when she was placed into the Intro to Integrated Science, taught by an agricultural educator from Snohomish High School. Through high school she showed market goats and raised market hogs as her supervised agricultural experience. As well as being a student at the University of Idaho, Makenna is a member of the College of Agricultural and Life Sciences ambassador team, Block and Bridle, Collegiate FFA and Sigma Alpha professional sorority.

Makenna was attracted to a degree in agricultural education as she was previously inspired by her ag teachers and continually inspired by the diversity of the degree. The degree provides her with opportunities from working in an animal science lab to working in the welding shop. Makenna has also had the opportunity to travel with various student organizations throughout her college career so far. She has traveled to events such as Block and Bridle national convention and national FFA convention. On these trips she enjoyed being exposed to various agricultural industries while learning about professional development. Makenna’s career goal is to teach agriculture in a high school setting. She is excited to get into the classroom next spring with student teaching.

Written by TyAnn Tellefson

Meet our Student Teachers

AEE is immensely proud of all our student teachers on the way to completing their journeys at the University of Idaho.

Kylee FisherKylee Fisher — Nampa, Idaho

“I’ve enjoyed the conversations I hear on a daily basis — some interesting and funny topics that just make me shake my head.”

Riely GentzRiely Geritz — Jerome, Idaho

“My high school ag teacher, Marc Beitia, is my hero. He taught me the power of believing in someone relentlessly, so I decided to do the same.”

Samantha GundersonSamantha Gunderson — Kuna, Idaho

Q: What was the biggest surprise in your first week of teaching?
A: “How quickly I can go from welding to being covered in glitter.”

Abigail HeikesAbigail Heikes — Emmett, Idaho

“The best experience in student teaching so far has been watching students take lessons and apply it to AMAZING concept connections!”

Emily HicksEmily Hicks — Imbler, Oregon

“I chose the AgEd major because I wanted to make a difference in the lives of students.”

Ryan KindallRyan Kindall — Hagerman, Idaho

“My favorite part of student teaching has been seeing that light flicker on, and when that light stays on and grows brighter and brighter.”

Erin PeekErin Peek — Ellensburg, Washington

Q: Why did you choose agricultural education?
A: “There are so many leadership opportunities and experiences in learning where your food comes from that I wanted to share with students.”

Chelsey SharpChelsey Sharp — Elgin, Oregon

Q: Biggest surprise in student teaching?
A: “The amazing support system that exists in the community of ag teachers.”

Dino VinciDino Vinci — Meridian, Idaho

Q: What do you miss most about Moscow?
A: “Being a student — learning from some of the world’s most knowledgeable people is a privilege!”

Writer Spotlight

Riley HaunRiley Haun is a sophomore studying journalism and political science. She was raised on a small Red Angus farm in southern Idaho and grew up showing her cattle around the northwest. Riley was an active member of the Homedale FFA chapter during high school, where her favorite Career Development Event was prepared public speaking. As well as studying at U of I, Riley currently works at C & L Locker, a family-owned custom butcher shop in Moscow, doing everything from slicing jerky to wrapping rib roasts.

Riley was drawn to the journalism major because of its potential as a strong base of ethics and skills for law school later on, where she hopes to study constitutional law. As a journalism major, she enjoys writing stories about the lesser-known aspects of everyday life and connecting with people. This, as well as keeping in touch with her agricultural roots and sharing a respect for those who work in the industry, is what she loves about working with the Agricultural and Extension Education Department. Her favorite thing about being a Vandal is the sense of support among the community, no matter where she goes, whether it be the Ag Ed faculty or classmates in her journalism courses.

Written by TyAnn Tellefson


Spring Forward

There’s something about spring that is magical. The winter melts away, the days get warmer, and for those in north Idaho, we get to remember what the sun looks like. New livestock are born, crops begin growing and it seems like a great time to think about renewal.

From an ag teacher standpoint, there are many reasons to be excited once the weather warms up; helping students prepare for State Leadership Conference, anticipating an annual plant sale or planning for fair season can all help shake the winter blues. It’s a great time of year to think about personal growth and try something new. For this edition of The Hoot, let us think about why spring is the best time to try something new and examine some ways to help you “Spring Forward” in the classroom and beyond.

Figure 1. Phases of first year teacher's attitudes toward teaching (Moir, 1999). Reprinted with permission. First, some true facts about agricultural educators and spring. Researchers have studied the attitudinal shifts in teachers and found some truth to the “winter blues” for teachers. Moir (1990) conducted a qualitative study of more than 1,500 first-year teachers to determine how their attitude changed through the year. From her research, she developed a graphic depicting the highs and lows of teacher attitude, shown in Figure 1. (Figure 1. Phases of first year teacher's attitudes toward teaching (Moir, 1999). Reprinted with permission.)

Figure 2. Phases of first year agricultural educators’ attitudes toward teaching.Moir’s curve includes six stages; anticipation, survival, disillusionment, rejuvenation, reflection and anticipation. Would it surprise you to know that ag teachers curve looks slightly different? The low point for agricultural educators’ actually dips in January, with pressure for district and state award applications, and a shift in the new semester, then peaks again near mid-March, when many states hold their annual leadership conferences. Think about your year. How close do your moods follow the model shown in Figure 2? (Figure 2. Phases of first year agricultural educators’ attitudes toward teaching.)

So, if it is time for rejuvenation and reflection, how can we try something new without slipping into disillusionment? Here are some things to try:

  • Get out — Teach class outside on a warm sunny day. Studies have provided evidence that many students will focus more on their work and be less distracted if you move into an outdoor location with lots of sunlight. Can’t be outside all class period? That’s fine. Take students outside during work time. In a shop? Open the shop doors (if your school security allows) to bring the outdoors in.
  • Get your groove on — Add collective music to work time. Listening to the same music, as opposed to letting students use their headphones, builds a team environment, allows students to access their creative left brain and can cut down on chit chat. Pro tip: students will complain about your music choice the least if you choose ‘80s rock. The Journey station on Spotify is a winner.
  • Get creative — Think about an upcoming lesson. Is there something you still have to teach this year that doesn’t excite you? Spend 90 minutes and improve it. Search Pinterest for a new way to share the information with your class, google your topic and “lesson plan” to see what already exists in the digital world for your topic.
  • Phone a friend — If you can’t think of a way to spruce up a lesson, call an ag teacher buddy. Even better, post on a social media discussion board to connect with teachers around the country. That way, the good ideas shared with you are left for all to see.

Every day is a new opportunity to do something exciting with your classes. Not only are you helping your students when you make an improvement, it is also important to building your self-efficacy as a teacher, and increasing your professional optimism. Using these ideas could help you embrace the spring with a newfound passion for what you do, and who you do it for.

Contributed by Kasee Smith, Ph.D., assistant professor


A note from our editors

TyAnn TellefsonRiley HaunWith spring around the corner, we send our best wishes to the ever-growing Vandal family for each of you in your spring activities.

TyAnn Tellefson is majoring in agricultural science, communications and leadership, as well as animal and veterinary science. Riley Haun is a journalism and political science major. The newsletter is supervised by Jeremy Falk.

Contact

Department of Agricultural & Extension Education

Physical Address:
Agricultural & Extension Education Building, Room 102
1134 West 6th Street

Mailing Address:
875 Perimeter Drive MS 2040
Moscow, ID 83844-2040

Phone: 208-885-6358

Fax: 208-885-4039

Email: aee@uidaho.edu

Web: uidaho.edu/cals/aee

Directions