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Friday Letter Archive

The Friday Letter is U of I’s long-running, weekly message straight from the president to members of the Vandal family. Each week during the academic year, and with breaks for holidays, the president offers an update on Vandal teaching and learning, research and scholarship, and notable initiatives and priorities. Alumni and friends are welcome to join students, faculty and staff in receiving the newsletter.

Letter from the President
Office of the President | president@uidaho.edu
May 15, 2020
Dear Vandals,
The Class of 2020 will always hold a special place in the history of our alma mater.

Our spring graduates have demonstrated, given the unforeseen obstacles of this semester, that they can overcome adversity and pivot to new ways of learning. Vandals have done this work while spending the final two months completing their courses online due to COVID-19. More than 1,600 will earn their degree after this week’s final exams, the largest spring class in the past five years.

They’ve followed their passions and have put in long hours to achieve their goals. Many have jobs lined up, and others have plans to continue at the University of Idaho for graduate school. They’ve done this hard work during unprecedented times and still found ways to help the community and the state of Idaho.

Dillon Alexander is one of those students. Originally from New Mexico, Dillon relocated to Idaho to pursue a double major in both fire ecology and management, and forestry. He wanted to better understand fire management and the ecological health of natural landscapes across North America; and he knew he wanted to do that at the University of Idaho.

He found a U of I education "enhanced my skills in professional communication, collaboration with other professionals, writing and interpreting prescribed fire plans," and helped him develop a concrete understanding of fire management and forestry practices.

Dillon fought fires as a student with the Clearwater-Potlatch Timber Protective Association, where he’s being hired on full time. He will assist in fire and hazard management, administrative duties and supervision of seasonal employees in his new position, which begins after graduation.

Graduates like Dillon have worked hard to join the ranks of our more than 110,000 Vandal alumni. These Vandals are entering the next phase of their lives after graduating from a university that has the highest average starting salary of any public college or university in the state. Even in these uncertain and challenging economic times, a Vandal degree holds so much promise.

It’s unfortunate we can’t celebrate the Class of 2020 in person this weekend, but their achievements won’t go unnoticed. Each graduate will receive a “Celebration in a Box” in the mail with the diploma cover they would have received at our ceremony, as well as an event program and some Vandal-themed gear. It's our way of honoring this milestone while being cognizant of the realities surrounding COVID-19.

I’m looking forward to the moment we can congratulate each and every member of the Class of 2020 in person at a Summer Commencement ceremony Saturday, Aug. 1.

Summer Commencement will also be a return to the new normal, just a few weeks before we begin in-person fall classes. The vibrant buzz of students is what makes our university whole, and I’m looking forward to its return.

Until then, congratulations to the Class of 2020! We are proud of you and all the work you’ve done to earn your University of Idaho diploma.

Go Vandals!

C. Scott Green
President
Latest News

from U of I

Class of 2020: Honoring Our Legacy

Our story began more than 130 years ago and continues today as dreams become opportunities for University of Idaho students. Congratulations to the Class of 2020. Watch the video >

Podcast Tackles U of I COVID-19 Research

Why is it hard to pin down the infection and death rate of COVID-19? Biological Sciences Associate Professor Tanya Miura talks about complexities of studying the pandemic on the latest episode of The Vandal Theory. Listen to the podcast >

Activity Book Promotes Learning With Games

The Idaho Regional Mathematics Center at U of I Coeur d’Alene has a new resource available to parents and teachers to keep students engaged with math lessons during this extended time out of the classroom. Read more >
Did you know?
Free Drive-In Movies Playing in Kibbie Dome Parking Lot: The ASUI-Kibbie Activity Center gravel parking lot in Moscow will be transformed into a free drive-in movie theater for the next four Saturdays as part of a partnership among U of I, the City of Moscow and Kenworthy Performing Arts Centre. Learn more >

Letter from the President
Office of the President | president@uidaho.edu
May 8, 2020
Dear Vandals,
Everywhere you look, you find the University of Idaho delivering on our statewide mission in an impactful way. We have demonstrated this impact in a series of videos:
  • The State of the University
  • The Impact Across Our Colleges
  • A Year In Review, 2019-20
State of the University
There is no question we have faced unprecedented challenges this year, between ongoing budget issues and pivoting to remote learning amid COVID-19. Our response to these difficulties demonstrates the resilience and reliability of this great institution. I shared that message of resilience with faculty, staff and students this week in our State of the University video.

We have addressed our budget issues head on and made sacrifices to move the university forward. We have stepped up to the difficulties of COVID-19 and delivered more than 4,000 class sections remotely. We will finish the semester strong and graduate the Class of 2020 through the extraordinary effort of everyone in the University of Idaho community. U of I’s positive impact on the state of Idaho, its people and its economy continues.

It’s unfortunate I couldn’t present the address in person, but I remain optimistic about our future and am eager to report on the many successes from this challenging year.

Impact Across Our Colleges
The University of Idaho’s impact is found in our famous potatoes, virtual technology and design labs, the Barker Trading Program, teacher training, cybersecurity research, the McCall Field Campus experience, the list goes on and on.

The annual State of the University is our chance to focus on that impact. Without the ability to gather and share our story in person, we’ve collected a series of video highlights that demonstrate the great work our colleges deliver across Vandal Country.

A Year in Review
Years from now, we’ll look back on today’s difficulties as a time when we were tested. We can be proud of what we found – the Vandal Family is indeed Brave and Bold. This video is a fast-moving look at our Brave and Bold response to a challenging year. I am confident we will make it to the other side of these challenges and be stronger for it, in large part because of the devotion of our Vandal Family.

By Idaho. In Idaho. For Idaho. Our impact can be found in every corner of the university, in every corner of the state … and beyond. Enjoy these videos and others at uidaho.edu/sotu

Go Vandals!

C. Scott Green
President
Latest News

from U of I

Students Named Fellows of Nuclear Security Program: Two College of Engineering graduate students, Nicholas Williams and Jonathan Tacke, have been accepted into a prestigious fellows program of the National Nuclear Security Administration, a semi-autonomous agency within the U.S. Department of Energy.

Faculty Member and Alumnus Receive Fulbright Awards: Casey Rebecca Johnson, an assistant professor of philosophy; and Olivia Comstock, a 2019 alumna with a degree in philosophy, have been awarded Fulbright awards for the 2020-21 academic year.

Students Receive NSF Research Fellowships: Four student-researchers have been awarded National Science Foundation (NSF) Graduate Research Program Fellowships for 2020, which recognizes outstanding graduate students in STEM fields.

Gates Grant Funds Team Testing Human Milk for Novel Coronavirus

The U of I lab headed by Mark and Michelle “Shelley” McGuire will work with the University of Rochester to test human milk samples through a project funded by the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation. Read more >

U of I Supports a Swimming Recovery of Idaho's Burbot

The Kootenai Tribe of Idaho gathered experts from across the Northwest, including U of I's Aquaculture Research Institute, to rescue the leopard-spotted freshwater cod from local extinction. Read more >
Pride points
4-H impacts all Gem State communities from the University of Idaho: Watch the video about this spring's 4-H Know Your Government Conference in Boise >

Letter from the President
Office of the President | president@uidaho.edu
May 1, 2020
Dear Vandals,
An innovative and entrepreneurial spirit is part of our Vandal DNA.

Senior engineering students competing at our Engineering Design EXPO are pursuing ideas that advance renewable fuels or create better virtual cattle fencing, among other innovative concepts. Vandal business and engineering teams are also fine-tuning a medical device that prevents infections in patients admitted for extended hospital stays and pitching the invention to industry.

Industry partners are crucial to the success of our students, especially in the growing field of cybersecurity. U of I has been a cybersecurity leader since being recognized as one of the first seven Centers of Academic Excellence in Cyber Defense by the National Security Agency. Supplying the talent to protect our digital infrastructure is vital in today’s world and important to partners like Schweitzer Engineering Laboratories (SEL).

SEL already employs more than 300 Vandal alumni, is a top recruiter of graduates from the College of Engineering and is a supporter of our record-breaking research engine. Today, I’m proud to announce –  thanks to support from SEL –  the expansion of our cybersecurity degree program. A new $2.5 million investment from the Palouse-based company over the next five years will fund direct program support and contracted research focused on developing inherently cyber-secure industrial control systems.

This research will not only protect our nation’s utility infrastructure, but it will have broad application in control systems deployed throughout the country. It represents the significant, impactful and sought-after solutions our university produces to benefit our state, region and the nation.

That spirit of innovation motivates us to continue recognizing the hard work and trailblazing thinking of our Vandals through events each spring like the Undergraduate Research Symposium and Engineering Design EXPO.

EXPO normally fills the Bruce M. Pitman Center with more than 500 K-12 students interested in learning more about engineering from teams of U of I seniors presenting their ideas and prototypes. Today’s virtual EXPO features senior engineering teams presenting their projects online.

Projects are still completed in conjunction with industry sponsors and other clients, each looking to our Vandals to improve their output. Student posters and descriptions are available for public viewing, and volunteer judges are scoring technical presentations throughout the day. An extended EXPO experience open to all fifth- through 12th-grade students is taking place over the next few weeks.

The EXPO tradition continues this year with support from SEL, presenting sponsor of our virtual event. I want to share my deep gratitude for SEL’s continued generous investment and support of our College of Engineering. They recognize the value in our graduates, many of whom go on to work for SEL.

The company’s support is an investment in U of I students that we see returned through events like today’s EXPO. It also nurtures the culture of innovation Vandals demonstrate every day in the classroom, the workplace and beyond.

Go Vandals!

C. Scott Green
President
Latest News

from U of I

Here We Have Idaho Available Online

The Spring 2020 issue of the University of Idaho alumni magazine, Here We Have Idaho, has hit mailboxes and is available online. "Made By Idaho, In Idaho, For Idaho," the magazine celebrates U of I's impact in all corners of the Gem State. Read the magazine >

Students Serve as Legislative Reporters

Riley Haun, Madison Hardy and Logan Finney reported on the Idaho Legislature for statewide newspapers as McClure Center journalism interns. Watch the video >

U of I Scientists Study Sawfish Teeth

Jensen Hegg, a postdoctoral researcher in the Department of Fish and Wildlife Sciences, is part of a team attempting to locate and better protect the fish. Read the story >
Pride points
Idaho high school students are displaying their work online this semester as part of the College of Art and Architecture's annual exhibition. Projects focus on "EARTH: Concepts on Climate." View the winning entries >

Letter from the President
Office of the President | president@uidaho.edu
April 24, 2020
Dear Vandals,
Spring is a time to celebrate the University of Idaho community, and recognizing the success of students, faculty and staff this year remains a top priority despite the switch to remote learning.

U of I students will be honored in the next week at the virtual Student Achievement Awards ceremony. I am grateful and excited to have the opportunity to present two of the many honors that will be awarded there.

Faculty and staff are being recognized as well, in acknowledgment of their dedication and continued accomplishments in teaching and research. The University Awards for Excellence are being announced online this week in place of a May ceremony.

Among the recipients are three educators earning U of I’s highest faculty rank of University Distinguished Professor. Lee Vierling, who leads the Department of Natural Resources and Society; flutist Leonard Garrison, associate director of the Lionel Hampton School of Music; and English Professor Scott Slovic, a national leader in environmental humanities; were each selected for this distinction.

These distinguished professor designations are among nearly three dozen awards that will be presented to faculty and staff this spring to honor excellence and achievement in our Vandal community. For example, the Lawrence C. McBride Prize recognizes staff members who go above and beyond expectations. This year’s recipient is University of Idaho Foundation Associate Endowments Director Barbara Warnick, who has supported students and donors at the university since 2001. An eight-member team from U of I’s McCall Outdoor Science School is also being lauded for efforts in the staff category.

April is among the busiest times in higher education. Students are working to finish their spring studies while staff and faculty are completing grading, evaluating projects and planning events that culminate in honoring the Class of 2020.

COVID-19 may have changed how we applaud that good work this spring, but it won’t keep us from these long-held traditions. We are in the top 6% of all public universities and colleges in the nation, and that doesn’t happen by mistake. It takes a team of innovative faculty and staff working together to deliver a high-quality education and be of service to our students. This team has risen to the current challenge around the pandemic and proven to all of us we can handle whatever is thrown our way.  

Vandal students are continuing to prosper as a result, including four who were recognized this spring as either Goldwater Scholars or Fulbright Scholars by two of the country’s most prestigious scholarship programs.

Michael Bishop, a Master of Fine Arts candidate in creative writing from Hawaii, this spring received a Fulbright Open Study/Research Award to New Zealand where he will conduct research for a creative nonfiction project. Annarose Qualls, a 2019 graduate from Moscow who earned degrees in international studies, Spanish and Latin American studies, received a Fulbright Award to assist local English teachers in Colombia.

Our Goldwater Scholars are juniors Beth Hoots and Isabell Strawn, who are each receiving support from the program for students interested in STEM research careers. Hoots is from Oregon and a dual major in ecology and conservation biology and Spanish. She received the award for her work studying the health of Lake Coeur d’Alene. Strawn is a biological engineering major from Moscow and will use the scholarship to continue her research, which involves eliminating toxic chemicals from our nation’s groundwater.

These awards are just a few of the examples of Vandal excellence we see in our community each and every day. It’s part of the Vandal Story that’s important to tell whether we’re together in person or remotely – and to everyone who will listen.

Go Vandals!

C. Scott Green
President
Latest News

from U of I

Summer Commencement Scheduled,
In-Person Classes Set for August Return

U of I is finalizing plans for when the Vandal Family can be together again. We’re continuing to work with public health leaders to coordinate a return of in-person classes in the fall. A Summer Commencement Ceremony will mark that return, and is scheduled for Saturday, Aug. 1, in the ASUI-Kibbie Activity Center to celebrate the Class of 2020. Graduates also have the opportunity to attend the December 2020 or May 2021 ceremonies. Read more >

Library Initiative Explores Flu Pandemic 

Materials depicting the impact of the 1918 "Spanish Flu" on the Palouse are on display as part of the University of Idaho Library's Digital Initiatives. Read more >

ASUI Does Its Part to Flatten the Curve

Student leaders released a video this week encouraging Vandals to stay home and "social distance" during the COVID-19 pandemic. See the video >
Pride points
University of Idaho Works to Develop Cure for COVID-19: A Department of Biological Sciences team is working to identify a cure for coronaviruses, including COVID-19, and expects to finish preliminary tests within a year. Researchers will also develop a pipeline for identifying drugs that block viruses from infecting human cells. Learn more >

Letter from the President
Office of the President | president@uidaho.edu
April 17, 2020
Dear Vandals,
This isn’t the first time a virus has changed students’ lives at the University of Idaho. As recently as the fall of 1957, the women of Gamma Phi Beta sorority were forced to quarantine for a time during that year's flu pandemic.

Vandals rolled with the punches then and are just as resilient today. (Scroll to the bottom of this message to see a video highlighting our pride in being Vandal Strong right now.)

Still, our staff and faculty are working every day to provide some semblance of routine.

Our students have demonstrated their focus and adaptability during the COVID-19 pandemic. They continue to attend classes remotely and are completing their coursework despite not being allowed to meet in groups or otherwise enjoy springtime on the beautiful Moscow campus. Student clubs continue to hold meetings via Zoom. I was able to attend a meeting with the Student Alumni Relations Board last week, and we had a great conversation.

Some students, many of whom had no other housing option, are still living on campus. About 300 remain in on-campus residence halls, and nine of our 26 Greek chapter houses continue to serve as primary homes for a small number of fraternity and sorority members.

Our staff and faculty have worked hard to ensure students have online access to non-academic resources. Student appointments at our Counseling and Testing Center are continuing as scheduled via phone and video conferencing. In addition, Housing and Residence Life, Vandals Dining and Fraternity and Sorority Life teams have done a fantastic job of keeping life as normal as possible for students.

Many on-campus students are still being fed by The HUB dining hall, and we are exceeding Centers for Disease Control and Prevention guidelines for takeout food service. Students can order from a menu catered to dietary needs and get daily grab-and-go meals. The HUB’s executive chef is taking those meal orders himself to limit person-to-person interaction between students and the rest of the staff.

Students who are self-isolating because of exposure to the virus are getting meals delivered to their floors by our team in Environmental Health and Safety. They’re also getting needed medical deliveries.

Students who stayed home following Spring Break don’t need to be in any rush to move out of their residence hall rooms. Housing will continue to hold onto student belongings until it’s safe to retrieve them. Please know that pro-rated housing and dining credits have been given to those Vandals for days they weren’t able to use our services.

Students living in Greek houses are also observing strict social distancing practices and many have either stopped or greatly modified their meal service. They are still holding governing meetings with chapters coming together virtually to conduct business. Fraternity and Sorority Life has created a webinar series to connect chapter leaders with resources on how to do their important work online.

Just like the Gamma Phis in 1957, we are also looking toward an eventual return to normal. We have a lot of people to thank for making all the changes required to adjust to this new reality – staff, faculty and students and their families. Efforts by housing, dining and Greek support teams are helping us keep these essential services in place until all Vandals can gather and celebrate in a safe and healthy way.

Go Vandals!

C. Scott Green
President
P.S. While moms and dads and other family members may not be able to enjoy Spring Parent and Family Weekend, which would have started today, we hope you plan to celebrate with the entire Vandal Family Nov. 6-8 during our fall event.
Latest News

from U of I

Vandal Strong, We Are. Keep Calm and Vandal On. Watch the Video >
Snapshots

Student and Faculty Success

Two U of I Students Named 2020 Goldwater Scholars: Juniors Beth Hoots and Isabell Strawn have been named 2020 Goldwater Scholars.The national scholarship program supports students interested in STEM research careers.

Rural Studies Program, Extension Develop COVID-19 Infographics: The Rural Studies Program and U of I Extension have developed infographics for every county in Idaho and the state to manage the unknown around the threat of coronavirus.

Faculty Named Best Educators in General Education Areas: English Senior Instructor Barbara Kirchmeier and Psychology and Communication Studies Senior Instructor Diane Carter have been recognized as statewide finalists for their work at the annual General Education Summit in Boise.

Did you know?
School of Music Offers Free Music Performances Via Facebook Live:
U of I's Lionel Hampton School of Music is hosting a series of free live-streamed performances through May 15 to entertain community members at a distance. See the schedule >

Letter from the President
Office of the President | president@uidaho.edu
April 10, 2020
Dear Vandals,

The University of Idaho’s research enterprise is unique among higher education. Our faculty and staff not only contribute new discoveries and partner with the state and private industry to find solutions to world problems, they teach our students – both graduate and undergraduate – in the lab and the classroom every day.  

That research hasn’t taken a break since COVID-19’s arrival, but the global pandemic and statewide stay-at-home order have changed how we conduct this work.  

We continue to collaborate with our research partners to address questions and provide solutions that benefit our state, including offers of equipment and support in the fight against coronavirus. Our dozen-member team from the Institute for Modeling Collaboration and Innovation is leading COVID-19 modeling for Idaho cities and counties as part of an effort to understand the virus.

Additionally, engineers and others on campus continue to capitalize on our research mission, and are using feedback from local medical staff to improve upon open-source filtration mask designs and boost supplies of personal protective equipment, hand sanitizer, face shields and mobile mask sterilization systems. 

Brad Ritts, our interim vice president of research and economic development, has some important insights about the effort, as well as our field work and our Research Working Group

Scott Green: How is research at U of I changing in response to the COVID-19 pandemic? 

Brad Ritts: Our researchers recognize the critical importance of reducing transmission of this virus and we’ve taken steps to defer non-essential research, comply with the stay-at-home order, observe social distancing and other precautions in our critical on-site research, which continues. One critical response that highlights the importance of research universities has been the rapid shift to work on COVID-19 around campus. We have several groups studying virus transmission and they are leading modeling efforts on the impact across Idaho. Others are finding ways to build and distribute filtration masks, protective equipment and hand sanitizer to Palouse-area hospitals. Our rapid ramp-up in these topics is enabled by the established, underlying technical capability and experience that results from our university’s research mission. 

SG: Funding for our research continues to grow. U of I conducted $113 million in research last year. How does that translate into the work we do on campus and around the state? 

BR: I’m proud of the leading role our university has in generating and disseminating new knowledge to help address Idaho’s challenges and capitalize on Idaho’s opportunities. The research funding our investigators bring to the university and the activity that investment generates contributes to our local and state economy and builds our state’s intellectual capital by attracting talented faculty, staff and students – and by training students who go on to join the workforce. When one looks at some of our most prominent research programs – forestry and forest products, agriculture, cybersecurity – it’s clear our work is addressing issues that matter to Idaho, Idahoans and the economic success of our state. 

SG: You’re chairing our Research Working Group. What is your primary focus of the working group? What role do you see that working group having in our university’s ability to achieve R-1 status by the Carnegie Classification of Institutions of Higher Education? 

BR: The working group is focused on attainable strategies that will increase the stature, productivity and quality of research and graduate education at the university. If we improve our productivity enough, we may achieve an R-1 ranking, which is a classification based on the amount of research and graduate education universities complete as measured by factors including research expenditures and doctoral degrees awarded. Achieving R-1 would be notable for a comprehensive university of our size and will require some investment, but will indicate we’ve expanded opportunities for undergraduate and graduate students to participate in cutting-edge research, originated more state-of-the-art innovation and grown more startup companies out of the university.  

SG: How important is research to our students’ future careers? Why should we get more students involved in research? 

BR: Students at a research university learn from professors who are at the top of their fields. These professors define the future of their disciplines and can convey the growth and change of their fields to students. Looking back over my own education, the most defining moment came when I walked into a geology professor’s lab and told him I was interested in his field and wanted to get involved in research as an undergraduate. I left the lab that day with several ideas for projects and an invitation to join that professor’s research group for fieldwork that summer. I want those kinds of research experiences and close interactions with faculty and graduate students to be available to all undergraduates who want them, and I think the statistics on undergraduate participation in research at U of I show we’ve got a great start. 

SG: What’s an example of research at U of I that gets you excited for the future?  

BR: Every time I meet a new researcher I get excited about a new topic – that’s the great thing about a comprehensive research university. Just before COVID-19 kept us home, I spent a couple hours touring facilities and talking with students and faculty in the Department of Psychology and Communication Studies. We saw project after project of innovative investigation into perception, awareness and decision-making, leaving me hungry to learn more. Another example is an area of strategic growth I think is very important for us: the broad area of sustainability. We need to draw on some of our core, long-term strengths in areas like water resources, mineral extraction, agriculture and natural resources and integrate with initiatives that address the technical, commercial, political and policy influences on how our economy and those industries can continue sustainable, beneficial growth.   

SG: Thanks, Brad, for your effort to prioritize our research mission, especially as we gear up for this fight against COVID-19.  

Go Vandals!

C. Scott Green
President
Brad Ritts
Interim Vice President for Research and Economic Development
Latest News

from U of I

Torrey Lawrence Named Interim Provost and Executive Vice President: Torrey Lawrence, U of I's vice provost for faculty, has been selected as interim provost and executive vice president. He will take over May 3 for current Provost and Executive Vice President John Wiencek, who is taking a position as provost and executive vice president at the University of Akron. Learn more >

Idaho WWAMI Launches PPE Drive

Idaho WWAMI Medical Education Program students, with the support of the North Idaho Area Health Education Center, have organized a supply drive to help hospitals, clinics and first responders around Moscow, Pullman and surrounding areas obtain personal protective equipment (PPE) as part of the fight against COVID-19. Read more >
Snapshots

Spotlight On Students

Alumna, Student Receive Fulbright Awards: Michael Bishop, a Master of Fine Arts candidate in creative writing from Hawaii, and Annarose Qualls, a 2019 alumna from Moscow who earned degrees in international studies, Spanish and Latin American studies, have both been awarded Fulbright awards for the 2020-21 academic year.

Students Earn Top Awards for Theatre Work: Four theatre students and Professor Emeritus Forrest Sears are among the recipients of top awards from the Region 7 Kennedy Center American College Theatre Festival in Fort Collins, Colorado.

Senior Researcher Works on Prototype to Fence Cattle: Chanelle Brusseau's project is to create a prototype for virtual fencing, which could replace standard cattle fences by using devices to administer an electrical pulse when animals cross a defined virtual barrier.

Letter from the President
Office of the President | president@uidaho.edu
April 3, 2020
Dear Vandals,
The COVID-19 pandemic continues to challenge our community, state and the world, and the Vandal Family continues to rise to that challenge.

We can all be proud of how faculty, staff and students are adapting to the current situation. All of our more than 4,000 full-term spring class sections are being taught at a distance, and as many as 170 faculty and staff meetings are taking place at once via video conferencing. There are many more specific examples, though, of the practical problem-solving Vandals are delivering.

Faculty and staff in U of I’s College of Engineering are providing crucial design updates and production guidelines to launch a communitywide effort to 3D-print N95-type masks – the devices worn by medical professionals treating COVID-19 patients.

With a design expected to be finalized this week, work will begin with 3D printing partners across Idaho and Washington to mass-produce these masks for delivery to hospitals in need. 3D printers from four U of I colleges have been enlisted in the effort, and prototypes have already been validated by healthcare providers in the Lewiston-Clarkston Valley.

Faculty in Apparel, Textiles and Design are working with regional medical professionals on a design and online instructions for those willing to sew cloth masks. And Theatre Arts students have switched from making costumes to sewing cloth masks that can both cover and extend the life of N95 masks.

On Sunday, Idaho INBRE (IDeA Network of Biomedical Research) administrators donated about 33 boxes of personal protective equipment from a long-finished university project to Gritman Medical Center in Moscow. Retired laboratory technician Claudia Deobald alerted the lab that it had leftover gowns, cuffs and other equipment that could be used by doctors and nurses treating coronavirus, then worked with Gritman to put it to use.

As I mentioned last week, Idaho’s medical providers are receiving regular telehealth updates about the virus, its transmission and how to respond to an outbreak through our Project ECHO program. The first session was such a success – more than 700 attended – that the Idaho WWAMI Medical Education Program decided to hold twice-weekly sessions to support our state’s medical professionals.

Even while staying home, Vandals are finding ways to help. A funding page to support students with emergencies they can’t pay for, such as transportation home or a stable internet connection, has raised about $18,000 at last count. The Vandal Community Relief fund drive, which will continue for the next several weeks, is also raising money for the Vandal Food Pantry and Project ECHO.

It has been a tough year for University of Idaho students, faculty and staff between budget challenges and preparing for the eventual arrival of COVID-19. It will get tougher, as we are now seeing and responding to signs of COVID-19 in our local community. In many ways, though, this has been our finest hour. Not only are we successfully responding to our own challenges, the Vandal Family is also finding ways to help others respond to their challenges as well. Proof positive that by supporting one another, Vandals emerge stronger and more resilient than ever.

Go Vandals!

C. Scott Green
President
P.S.: Our keen Vandal alumni provided an interesting note of history following my mention last week about using the former Targhee Hall to support Gritman Medical Center during the pandemic. The former residence hall, built in 1958 at the corner of Blake and Taylor avenues, was originally known as the Campus Club. It was built to replace the previous Campus Club dormitory that was destroyed by fire earlier that year. Only several years later did it become known as Targhee Hall.
Latest News

from U of I

Model EU Student Awarded Outstanding Delegate: Emma Williams, a junior majoring in history in U of I's College of Letters, Arts and Social Sciences, won Outstanding Delegate honors for her strong performance at the West Coast Model EU Conference March 6-7 in Seattle, Washington.

Faculty Honored for Work on 20th Century Small-Town Papers: Caitlin Cieslik-Miskimen, an assistant professor of journalism and mass media, was recognized for her scholarship by the International Communication Association, an international organization advancing the scholarly study of human communication.

Winners Named in Architectural Design Competition: College of Art and Architecture Students Mariah Soriano, Kevin Brzezicki and Claire Trout earned top honors in the 50th Idaho Concrete Masonry Association-sponsored Architectural Design Competition last month for designs conceptualizing a Pullman-Moscow Regional Airport terminal. 

Future Vandals Visiting Campus Virtually 

Prospective students can interact and engage with University of Idaho staff, talk to counselors, take a virtual tour, discover majors and even talk to a current student as part of our Virtual Visit program. Share the experience >

Letter from the President
Office of the President | president@uidaho.edu
March 27, 2020
Dear Vandals,
You never really know how strong a family is until it’s tested. I can tell you after this week, the Vandal Family is strong, and I have never been more proud to be a Vandal.

On Wednesday, our governor ordered all non-essential personnel to stay at home for the next 21 days. The order caps a tumultuous three weeks where our university community prepared to deliver distance learning, prepared the campus for the eventual arrival of the COVID-19 virus and prepared ourselves and our families for the fight. Our faculty, staff, students and alumni responded and delivered.

Our faculty members are delivering every course online. Our essential staff members are providing food and shelter and otherwise taking care of those students who had nowhere else to go. Other staff have been preparing to deliver their services to our community from home. Our students have worked through the changes and adjusted to the new normal, and our alumni have been incredibly supportive of university decisions and are helping our students during this uncertain period. It is a testimony to our commitment to each other and to the institution.

Despite all of the upheaval, the Moscow campus is quiet – we experienced a 63% drop in campus-based Wi-Fi usage compared to a normal week. Our virtual space, however, is bustling. More than 170 classes and meetings were taking place at any given time using the university’s videoconferencing software – six times our average. Some of those are one-on-one discussions, and others are 100-level lecture hall classes that allow 100 or more participants to engage.

Classes are being taught on schedule, just in a new way. Meetings are taking place. Video conferencing, video lectures, conference calls, even email and snail mail, are all tools we are using to deliver on our mission.

I am also proud that Vandals are at the forefront of helping the state of Idaho battle COVID-19. Project ECHO, our telehealth education program, hosted a successful virtual session this week for over 700 medical professionals throughout the state. Participants learned details about the virus, its transmission and how to respond to an outbreak in their community. University Distinguished Professor Holly Wichman, director of our Institute for Modeling Collaboration and Innovation, is coordinating a team of modelers from across Idaho to help the state predict the spread of the virus so resources can be deployed proactively and strategically.

Our staff also brought a decommissioned, stand-alone dorm on the edge of campus – the old Targhee Hall – back to life, providing 32 beds for use by our local hospital should they need it.

For those looking for a way to help our fellow Vandals who may be suffering from this emergency, we’ve launched a fundraising drive to support our Vandal Food Pantry, Project ECHO and the Bruce and Kathy Pitman Fund for Student Emergencies. We have a long history of Vandals helping Vandals in times of need.

These next few weeks will be among the most difficult we have faced, but I am confident we are up to the challenge. If you are worried about someone, please file a VandalCARE report so they can get the help they need. Let’s continue to be kind and supportive, and work together. In the interim,

Keep Calm and Vandal On.

C. Scott Green
President
Latest News

from U of I

Deans Announced for College of Natural Resources, College of Letters, Arts and Social Sciences: Dennis Becker has been named dean of the University of Idaho’s College of Natural Resources, while Sean Quinlan has been named dean of the College of Letters, Arts and Social Sciences.

Endowed Professorship in Potato Research Created at U of I: Efforts to improve potato storage technology will benefit from a $1 million investment to create an endowed research professorship made possible by alumni Wayne and Peggy Thiessen and the Idaho Potato Commission.

Idaho Clean Snowmobile Team Placed Fourth in National Challenge: The College of Engineering's Idaho Clean Snowmobile Team earned fourth place overall in the gasoline spark-ignited class at the 2020 Society of Automotive Engineers Clean Snowmobile Challenge, March 9-14. 

Students Visualizing an Ancient Giant

Virtual technology and design students are bringing a set of mammoth bones to life through art. Discovered in 1966, the approximately 11,700-year-old skeleton was found in Soda Springs and brought to U of I last year. The Visual Mammoth class is creating study tools for a geology course and providing students a glimpse into what the professional workplace is like. Read more from Vandals in Focus >
Did you know?
U of I Study: Improve Balance by Lightening Up about Posture 

Researchers in the Mind and Movement Lab in the College of Letters, Arts and Social Sciences found when older adults thought about posture as effortful, they had worse balance than when they stood in a relaxed way. Learn more >

Letter from the President
Office of the President | president@uidaho.edu
March 20, 2020
Dear Vandals,
Earlier this week, I walked across our beautiful campus. The sun was out, and signs of spring were present. Green shoots are jutting out of flower beds, trees are forming their buds, and even insects are stirring and flying about. Yet, as we all know, spring on our campus is going to be very different than those of the past.

This is an unprecedented time across the world as we prepare for the realities of the COVID-19 pandemic. In response, we have moved all of our classes to remote delivery methods, canceled our Commencement ceremonies and are practicing social distancing throughout the campus.

To say I am deeply saddened and already missing our students and the bustling activity that accompanies their presence would be an understatement. Our unique residential learning environment is certainly one of the differentiators that makes our university special.

We know this is a huge disruption to our community and a disappointment that we can’t celebrate our many successes together this spring. Slowing the spread of this virus is vitally important. The health and safety of our Vandal Family is our top priority.

That’s why, in this fast-changing situation, we have moved to deliver all classes online and through other distance formats next week (following Spring Break) for the remainder of the semester. We initially opted for a two-day test, but as the challenge and guidance from public health officials came into sharper focus, we had no choice but to make the shift to online/remote learning for the remainder of the semester to protect the health of our community.

We’ve also canceled all events with more than 10 people until we are confident they can be held safely. University staff and faculty meetings are being held by teleconference whenever possible.

An update on our response to the COVID-19 pandemic.

Unfortunately, these cancellations include Parent and Family Weekend in Moscow as well as the Spring 2020 Commencement ceremonies statewide. By making this determination now, we hope everyone is able to cancel any reservations and travel plans.

These decisions are difficult and are being re-evaluated daily as we consider how best to keep services in Moscow and around the state open and accessible. Updates on the university response to COVID-19 are being posted regularly on the U of I website.

While all classes will be delivered online, services at our Moscow campus and statewide locations will remain physically open to our students. Every opportunity for student-employees to continue work study and other options will be provided. Those who choose to stay home will still get the education, counseling, advising and mentoring services they need, just in a different format. For students who have nowhere else to go, and for those whose hometowns may not have broadband access, university residence halls are open and Vandals Dining is offering safe meal options. Greek students are working with their leaders regarding personal distance practices and delivery of services.

Vandals who are scheduled to graduate in May will still receive their diplomas in a timely manner. We will do our best to find a way to recognize the accomplishments of our graduating seniors. At a minimum, they will be invited to join us for our in-person ceremonies in December 2020 or May 2021. Celebrating the success of all our graduates is one of our most important traditions and celebrations. We promise to make it special.

The coronavirus has challenged all of us. It will continue to test us as we make this move to online and distance formats. We’re asking everyone to be patient, flexible and resilient while we navigate these changes.

We have made it through many significant crises in our 130-year history. We will make it through this one as well.

I am deeply grateful to our faculty and staff who are working long hours to adjust course delivery and doing everything possible to accommodate our students while keeping U of I safe and healthy. It is that dedication to our students that differentiates us – it is the Vandal way.

I ask that during this time we all take care of each other by doing what we can to limit the spread of this threat to our greater community. My thoughts are with our extended Vandal Family that we and our families remain safe. I look forward to seeing our entire Vandal Family together again soon.

Keep Calm and Vandal On.

Go Vandals!

C. Scott Green
President

Letter from the President
Office of the President | president@uidaho.edu
March 13, 2020
Dear Vandals,
The safety of the University of Idaho community is top of mind as we weigh the impacts of the worldwide coronavirus outbreak.

No current Vandal has been diagnosed with the respiratory disease, formally known as COVID-19, but it’s important we remain vigilant should the virus be detected at U of I, on the Palouse or anywhere in the state of Idaho.

U of I’s Infectious Disease Response Team has been meeting regularly since late January to monitor and plan. The team, made up of six subcommittees and a core group of campus leaders, also includes Moscow and Latah County representatives. It is monitoring the entire state for impacts to any of our many locations, and coordinating with Gritman Medical Center and Public Health – Idaho North Central District.

We care about the health and safety of everyone in our community and are working hard on plans to mitigate and limit any potential outbreak. We’ve created a website with U of I-specific resources and answers to frequently asked questions about the coronavirus.

Our custodial staff, with extra help from Environmental Health and Safety, has taken special care to increase disinfection efforts in high-traffic areas in response to the potential for an outbreak.

While the coronavirus is not directly impacting any of our statewide locations, campus leaders are encouraging anyone who may feel sick to self-isolate and call their doctor’s office if symptoms warrant.

Faculty members have been encouraged to be creative and flexible as we work through our options for course delivery.

To that end, the university has decided to test putting all classes online the Monday and Tuesday following Spring Break, March 23-24. It is possible that classes could remain online after March 24 and we have asked our faculty and students to be prepared should that occur. A trial run will better prepare us should altering university operations be necessary. Campus will remain open and all offices, labs and classrooms will be accessible.

We will continue to monitor and prepare to implement procedures to protect our students, staff and faculty as the situation on campus and at our centers across the state evolves.

The impact this virus could have on our community is changing rapidly, so it’s important we are both prepared and vigilant for every possible scenario.

Go Vandals!

C. Scott Green
President
Latest News

from U of I

Moscow Is an Idaho College Town with a Soul That Shines Through Year-Round

Moscow has a vibe that courses through the streets like cultural lifeblood – delivering dining, art, outdoor amenities and community spirit that is truly unique. Read more from the article in Seattle Magazine >

Engineering, Business Students Win $10,000 at Hollomon Health Innovation Challenge

Student entrepreneurs won second place and $10,000 after pitching CatheterX, a multi-channeled, spiral-designed urinary catheter, at the Hollomon Health Innovation Challenge in Seattle. Learn more >
Pride points
Dairyman to Manage Idaho CAFE: John W. Wright will serve as U of I's project manager for the new $25 million research dairy near Rupert. The dairy will serve as the core of the Idaho Center for Agriculture, Food and the Environment. Read the announcement >

Letter from the President
Office of the President | president@uidaho.edu
March 6, 2020
Dear Vandals,
We know about the achievements of our Vandal student-athletes on the field of play.

They put in hard work practicing every day to compete and be the very best versions of themselves.

That dedication was on display last weekend when our Vandal Men’s Track and Field Team finished fourth and Vandal Women’s Track and Field Team fifth during the 2020 Big Sky Indoor Championship. Swimmer Katie Hale also represented her team well during the recent WAC Championships, taking first place in the 100-yard backstroke.

Vandal fans, including myself, will fill the stands in Boise starting Tuesday to cheer on our student-athletes at the 2020 Men’s and Women’s Big Sky Basketball Championships.

It’s been a milestone season for our basketball teams. Men’s senior guard Trevon Allen recently passed 1,000 points and is moving up the top 10 all-time scoring list. Women’s Basketball Coach Jon Newlee notched his 300th career Division I win this season, including over 200 as a Vandal. I can’t wait to see impressive performances by student-athletes and Vandal coaches from both rosters.

Our staff is also gearing up to host NCAA March Madness First- and Second-Round games later this month in Spokane. This massive undertaking puts Vandal Athletics in the national spotlight.

Thank you to all the amazing Vandal Scholarship Fund chapters, volunteers and donors across the state who support our student-athletes.

We all want an athletic program we can be proud of. Excelling in coursework and as citizens of the community are just as important to that equation as performing well during a game. While our student-athletes show up every day on the field of play, they also set the bar high in the classroom.

Our Vandals have been posting a departmental GPA above 3.0 for each of the past 12 semesters, including tying an all-time high last fall.
More than 200 of our 325 student-athletes earned GPAs over 3.0, including 68 who had perfect 4.0s. Over 60 of our student-athletes were named to the Fall Big Sky All-Academic Team.

Among those rankings, our Women’s Cross-Country team posted a 3.86 GPA in the fall, the fourth highest for a squad in the country. In January, the entire Vandal Swim and Dive roster was named to the Scholar All-American Team by the College Swimming and Diving Coaches Association of America for excellence in the classroom.

That hard work takes support, something we strive to give all our students at the University of Idaho. For our student-athletes, that includes nutrition. 

We opened the Athletics Fueling Center in September to support the nutritional needs of our student-athletes, providing healthy snacks and beverages to all of Vandal Athletics. Operated by U of I students and staff, the 576-square-foot space is in the north hallway of the ASUI-Kibbie Activity Center between the athletic training room and our strength and conditioning facility. This location is intentional, and will enhance our student-athletes’ performance and recovery.

We have amazing students at U of I, and our student-athletes are no exception. It’s important we support them and offer them the necessary resources to manage their overall health.

That’s what it means to be a part of the Vandal Family.

Go Vandals!

C. Scott Green
President
Latest News

from U of I

Assistant Professor Earns NSF CAREER Award: College of Engineering Assistant Professor Zouheir Rezki's grant from the National Science Foundation will go toward better communication between Earth and space.

Med Students Practice in the Wilderness: From the Idaho County Free Press: First- and second-year students from the Idaho WWAMI Medical Education Program learned the value of patient treatment in rural settings, including from a mass-casualty scenario, during a wilderness medicine training in Cottonwood.

Alumna-Led Nonprofit, U of I Student Benefit from Internship Experience: Palouse Land Trust Executive Director Lovina Englund ’05, M.S. ’07, was happy to find a good intern candidate in Sierra Hamilton, a senior in U of I's College of Natural Resources.

Did you know?
Idaho grows 322,000 acres of potatoes, and many of those spuds can track their linage to U of I. Jenny Durrin talks about U of I's potato nursery on "The Vandal Theory." Listen to the podcast >

Letter from the President
Office of the President | president@uidaho.edu
Feb. 28, 2020
Dear Vandals,
Music education is a vital component of this weekend’s Lionel Hampton Jazz Festival.

More than 3,600 students from hundreds of high schools across the Northwest and Canada are learning the latest in their craft from the jazz greats of our time. They’re also studying math, career planning, entrepreneurship and international relations.

Our signature University of Idaho jazz festival, now in its 53rd year, includes 400 student performances and over 60 workshops and clinics that develop the talent of young artists.

Supporting that talent is important. It’s exciting to see this learning opportunity present itself when a member of the Lionel Hampton Big Band takes the time to tutor a student one-on-one. These artists spend the day mentoring countless musicians, then take the stage for crowds at the ASUI-Kibbie Activity Center.

I’m looking forward to attending the festival's evening concerts, which will feature top student soloists competing for a University of Idaho scholarship from Avista, as well as performances by jazz greats Joshua Redman, Vertical Voices and all 16 members of the Lionel Hampton Big Band.

It will be just as inspiring to see these same artists work with high school students and our faculty on their music.

These students won’t all become professional musicians. Some will go into engineering or law, science or art. Our faculty from disciplines across the university are finding ways to integrate the art of jazz into festival lesson plans focusing on their own fields of study. Workshops that bridge science and art or teach the business of music create new avenues for these students to grow and elevate their craft.

That’s what’s so special about Lionel Hampton’s vision for music education. We’re teaching music, but we’re also opening these kids up to all of the possibilities available to them associated with a college education.

This weekend is the first time many of our future students get the chance to visit the University of Idaho campus. We want them to feel welcome and supported, because they could one day be the newest members of our Vandal Family.

Think of it as another way we can tell our story and support these students as they thrive on their chosen path. It is what the Lionel Hampton Jazz Festival is all about.

Go Vandals!

C. Scott Green
President
Latest News

from U of I

Zac Claus Hired as Head Men's Basketball Coach for the Vandals

Claus, the interim head coach, was hired for the permanent job. His mentorship will continue to elevate our student-athletes as he builds a quality program that excels in the classroom and on the court. Read more >

Vandal Swim and Dive Named to Scholar All-American Team

Congratulations to our entire Idaho Vandals Swimming and Diving roster for being named to the Scholar All-American Team by the College Swimming and Diving Coaches Association of America. Read more >
Fellowship Allows Student to Make Historic Jazz Blindfold Tests More Accessible: Mitch Gibbs, a senior from Snohomish, Washington, helped make the International Jazz Collection and Jazz writer Leonard Feather's findings available to the public.

Grandiose Plans Offered for Future of Lewiston’s Bollinger Center: From the Lewiston Tribune: University of Idaho architecture students have offered their versions of a bright future for the condemned former church and theater.

Prichard Art Gallery Exhibit Features Local Artists: The exhibit, “Four Old Guys Walk Into a Gallery,” includes display work in painting, photography, sculpture and visual text and runs through Saturday, April 11, in Moscow.

Letter from the President
Office of the President | president@uidaho.edu
Feb. 21, 2020
Dear Vandals,
4-H is the earliest opportunity for students to take a class from the University of Idaho.

As young as age 5, the community-based youth development program — delivered through U of I Extension — is inspiring youth in every county of the state to become responsible, productive citizens so they can meet the changing needs of society.

I spent three days meeting with Idaho’s agricultural leaders in Boise this week, including a breakfast organized by 4-H members as part of the group’s annual Know Your Government Conference. The eighth- and ninth-grade program is run by the students, who partner with Idaho lawmakers and the courts to simulate a legislative and judicial system.

Our delivery of 4-H youth development programs benefits everyone in Idaho and provides preparation for a college education. Statistics show 4-H participants are more likely to go to college and give back to the community. It may be the most impactful program to strengthen the connection of our youth to communities across the state.

These students are our future scientists, our future farmers, our future commodities brokers and our future leaders. Cultivating that future starts with inspiring and creating a thirst for knowledge among the 15,000-plus members of our 4-H programs.

That early support is important to our students once they enroll at the University of Idaho.

In addition to being ranked in the top 6% of public universities and colleges nationally, U.S. News and World Report also ranks the University of Idaho a Top 100 Best Value. A recent poll by the company Niche ranks our agricultural sciences program first in the Pacific Northwest — and higher than programs in every state that borders Idaho. At U of I, Idaho’s youth can learn from nationally recognized faculty, participate in cutting-edge research and elevate themselves in ways that enable them to accomplish their dreams.

We want to help agriculture prosper and support other key areas of Idaho’s economy by both educating the state’s students and through our research enterprise. Much of the more than $115 million in research U of I conducted last year focused on the agricultural commodities first planted at the 24,000 Idaho farms and ranches that contribute nearly one-fifth of the state’s economic output.

Idaho agriculture is a $16 billion industry that feeds this state and the entire world. Not only are we the nation’s top producer of potatoes, but we grow more malt barley than any other state in the country and are the nation’s fourth-largest wheat producing state. Idaho is also the third-largest dairy producer in the country. You’ve heard me talk about the Idaho Center for Agriculture, Food and the Environment (CAFE), our Magic Valley research dairy where work has already begun. Once fully operational, this research center will provide important, sustainable solutions for our partners in industry.

A 4-H class might be the first course students take from the University of Idaho, but we hope it’s not their last. When these students are ready to go on after high school, U of I will be there to support them any way we can.

Go Vandals!

C. Scott Green
President
Latest News

from U of I

Experience a Virtual U of I Campus Tour

Explore campus buildings and landmarks as part of our new and expanding YouVisit virtual tour. Take the tour >

U of I Master's Student Takes First Place in Statewide Three-Minute Thesis Competition 

Congratulations to Maribel Alfaro for winning first place in this week's statewide Three-Minute Thesis Competition. Maribel is a civil and environmental engineering master's student studying how to make biodegradable plastic from farm waste. Learn more >

Lionel Hampton Jazz Festival's 53rd Year Celebrated Next Weekend in Moscow

Thousands of young musicians will visit the U of I campus next weekend as we celebrate music education and welcome jazz icons Joshua Redman and Vertical Voices, as well as all 16 members of the Lionel Hampton Big Band to our annual celebration. Get Your Tickets >
Did you know?
University of Idaho Fish and Wildlife Sciences Department Head Lisette Waits has found a more efficient and cost-effective way to estimate Idaho's wolf populationLearn more from Spokane's KREM-TV >

 

Letter from the President
Office of the President | president@uidaho.edu
Feb. 14, 2020
Dear Vandals,
The ability of Idaho’s healthcare professionals to ask questions of experts around the state is an important asset, especially when resources are limited in rural communities.

Idaho knows Idaho, and no one is better equipped to break down barriers to the latest thinking in specialty medical care than another Gem State practitioner who might be facing a similar issue in another part of the state.

This is especially important when considering a challenge like the opioid epidemic. Bringing these groups together is the role of the University of Idaho’s Project ECHO program, a telehealth education initiative that links community healthcare professionals across the state.

ECHO (Extension for Community Health Outcomes) originated at the University of New Mexico and has since grown to more than 48 states. Idaho’s version is led by our Idaho WWAMI Medical Education Program, which has allowed future doctors to train in Idaho since 1972 through a partnership with the University of Washington School of Medicine.

Project ECHO Supports Idaho's Rural Providers Through Telehealth Education.

ECHO Idaho participants are getting answers from other state physicians, nurse practitioners, counselors and pharmacists on issues like medication monitoring, pain control and breaking down the stigma of mental health.

Each free session lasts one hour and includes a short presentation on a specific clinical topic followed by a patient case study. A social worker in Sandpoint might be working 300 miles away from a physician assistant in Salmon, but they’re dealing with similar issues in how best to treat their patients.

We need all members of the healthcare team pulling together if we want to address Idaho’s critical needs. ECHO Idaho does just that, helping healthcare professionals keep up with the changes in practicing medicine without leaving the clinic.

Our state’s healthcare providers continue to see the benefit. ECHO Idaho has connected more than 580 clinicians from all corners of the state — 76 communities across 37 counties — since the program began in 2018 at U of I Boise. It’s helped medical practitioners from Pocatello to Lewiston, Rexburg to Shoshone, find ways to best resolve their patient problems.

What started as a way to help providers deal with the opioid epidemic has since expanded with a focus on combating behavioral health issues. ECHO Behavioral Health follows the same model, connecting rural providers with specialist teams for real-time collaboration.

Doctors, nurses, social workers, physician assistants and other healthcare professionals have earned more than 2,500 credits of free continuing medical education through the program, a number that continues to rise with each bi-weekly session. Program leaders want to expand to other areas of medicine as well.

This valuable resource has created an Idaho-focused approach to treating some of the state’s difficult challenges. It’s a continued benefit for both our healers and the rural communities of Idaho.

Go Vandals!

C. Scott Green
President
Latest News

from U of I

Idaho Teachers Vandalize Classrooms in Silver and Gold

More than 1,500 classrooms across Idaho and the nation are showing their Vandal pride thanks to our Alumni Association's Vandalize the Classroom program. See Vandals Showing Their Pride >

Blue Cross of Idaho Foundation for Health Donates to Students

The $1.5 million donation from the foundation for Idaho’s premier health care insurance provider will support our Vandal Promise Scholarship and Idaho WWAMI Medical Education Program. Learn more >